Henrich Eisenhuth
Bernard Eisenhuth
(1755-1866)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Anna Maria Orwig

2. Catherine Saylor

Bernard Eisenhuth 2 3 4

  • Born: 10 Mar 1755, Lebanon, Lebanon, PA 5 6
  • Christened: 16 May 1755, Lebanon: Lutheran Church, Lebanon, PA 1 5
  • Marriage (1): Anna Maria Orwig
  • Marriage (2): Catherine Saylor in 1780 in , Berks, PA 1
  • Died: 22 Jun 1866, New Castle Twp., Schuylkill, PA at age 111 1 5 6 7
  • Buried: 23 Jun 1866, Ringtown: St. Paul's Old White Church Cemetery, Schuylkill, PA 6 8

   Other names for Bernard were Barnard Eisenhuth,9 Barney Eisenhuth,10 Bernet Eisenhuth 11 12 and Bernhard Eisenhuth.

  General Notes:

His obituary says he had 10 children. According to his obituary, his house was destroyed in 1806 along with the family records. There is considerable debate regarding Bernard's service in the Revolutionary War, as well as the service of his father. No records substantiating involvement have been found. Historians in Schuylkill County generally include Bernard in lists of those who served, but in the area where a soldier's specific military company or commander is specified the listing for Bernard merely says "tradition."

  Birth Notes:

His birth date may not be as reported in varous sources, including his obituary which listed him as the oldest living man in Pennsylvania aged 111 years, 3 months, and 12 days when he died on June 22, 1866. Several U.S. Census listings suggest he was actually born 10-11 years later.

  Noted events in his life were:

1. He had a residence in 1779 in , Berks, PA. 1 According to Bernard's obituary he was born in Lebanon and then removed to Berks County where he married Catherine Saylor in 1780, before moving to Centre County and later to Schuylkill County.

In 1780 the baptism record for his first child was recorded at Zion Red Church which at the time was in Berks County, which later was divided so the church today is in West Brunwick Township, Schuylkill County.

Therefore Bernard born in Lebanon likely moved north to the West Brunswick area, then to Centre County, and back to Schuylkill County where he is buried.

2. Tax List: Eisenhude, Barnet, 200 acres, tax 3.45 pounds, 1779, Pine Grove Twp., Berks, PA. 13

3. In 1780 in West Brunswick Twp.: Zion Red Church (Union Lutheran), Schuylkill, PA. His children by Anna Maria Orwig appear in the christening records of this church.

4. Tax List: Eisenhood, Bernard, 50 acres, no horses, no cows, 8.2 pounds, 1781, Brunswick Twp., Berks, PA. 14

5. He served in the military He volunteered for the Revolutionary War but never fought. His miliary status is "inactive duty." on 1 May 1782 in , Lancaster, PA. 12 15 Bernard volunteered but never served in the Revolutionary War nor saw battle. He didn't volunteer until May 1, 1782, and the war was essentially over the previous year with the surrender in Yorktown on October 17, 1781. Bernard was available to fight if the British invaded Pennsylvania again in 1782, but they did not.

He is probably the "Bernet Eisenhuth" record card on file in the Pennsylvania Archives which states in total:

Inactive Duty, Militia
Eisenhuth, Bernet
Lancaster County 9th Battalion 4th Company John Herkerider
Date: 1 May 1782
Published: A(5) VII, 954-5

No Eisenhuth in the Revolution is listed in "Pennsylvania, Veterans Burial Cards, 1777-1999" database of military graves.

In the Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Book Volume 137 1917-1918 is the lineage of Mrs. Sara Miller Ruth #136982 a descendant of Bernet Eisenhuth and Catharine Saylor's daughter Elizabeth who married Jesse Bean, and in that lineage is stated:
"Bernet Eisenhuth (1755-1866) served as private in the 9th battalion, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania militia under Capt. John Herkerider and Col. John Rogers. He was born in Lancaster County; died in Schuylkill County, Pa."

6. He appeared on the 1793 Pennsylvania Septennial Census census in 1793 in Manheim Twp., Berks, PA. This is now known as Schuylkill County.

7. He appeared on the census in 1800 in Brunswick Twp., Berks, PA. 16 The Bernard Eisenhuth household is listed in Brunswick, which was in Berks County in 1800 but later became Schuylkill County. The family consisted of:
Males (born)
Under 10 (1791-1800) = 1 son
26-44 (1756-1774) = 1 Bernard
45 & over (<=1755)
Females (born)
10-15 (1785-1790) = 2 daughters
26-44 (1756-1774) = 1 wife

8. He worked as a 1800 Pennsylvania Septennial in 1800 in Brunswick Twp., Berks, PA. His occupation is listed on census records as laborer. This is now known as Schuylkill County.

9. He appeared on the census in 1810 in Brunswick Twp., Berks, PA. 17 The 1810 Census lists Bernhard Eisenhood with this household:
Males (born)
Under 10 (1801-1810) = 4 sons
16-25 (1785-1794) = 1 son
26-44 (1766-1784) = 1 father Bernard
Females (born)
Under 10 (1801-1810) = 1 daughter
10-15 (1795-1800) = 1 daughter
16-25 (1785-1794) = 1 daughter
26-44 (1766-1784) = 1 wife

However, Bernard's age by his birth date should have been 55, so perhaps his birth date is wrong or the census recorder made an error?

10. He worked as a Timbering in Jan 1816 in New Berlin, Union, PA. By 1816, Bernard, his father-in law's family the Orwigs, and his eldest son George Eisenhuth pursued timbering in the wildness of Union and Centre counties. They succeeded in getting the Pennsylvania House and Senate to pass an act in 1868 signed by the Governor allowing them to build a mill race on Penn's Creek near New Berlin in Union County to transport logs down the creek to the Susquehanna River.

11. Book: Journal of the Senate of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Mar 1816. 18
26 Feb 1816
page 268

Agreeable to order,
The Senate resolved itself into a committe of the whole, Mr. Beale in the chair, on the bill from the House of Representatives, entitled
'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'
And after some time,
The committe rose and reported said bill with one amendment.

29 Feb 1816
page 270

The bill from the House of Representative, entited
'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'
was read the second time as reported by a committee of the whole yesterday, considered by section and agreed to.
Ordered, That said bill be prepared for a third reading.

1 Mar 1816
page 277

The bill from the House of Representatives, entitlted
'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'
was read the third time, and
Resolved, That this bill pass.


2 Mar 1816
page 282

That the House of Representatives have concurred in the amendments by Senate, to the bills, entitled as follow, viz,
'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'
The Speaker signed the bills presented for signature.

8 Mar 1816
page 309

Mr. McSherry from the committee appointed for the purpose, made further report in part, which was read as follows, to wit.
That in conjunction with a similar committee from the House of Representatives, they have compared, and on the 7th inst. presented to the Governor for his approbation, the bills, entitle as follow, viz.
'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'

11 Mar 1816
page 330

The Secretary fo the Commonwealth being introduced, present a message from the Governor, which was read as follows, to wit.

To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
I have this day approved and signed the following acts and resolution of the General Assembly, and directed the Secreatary of the Commonwealth to return them to the houses in which they respectively originated, viz.

4. 'An act to authorize George Eisenhuth, George Orwig, John Orwig and Jacob Orwig, to dig, establish and support a mill race on the north side of Penn's creek near the town of New Berlin, in the county of Union.'

12. Fact: Bernard was paid a bounty by Schuylkill County for delivering the scalps of wolves., 21 Apr 1817, , Schuylkill, PA. From "Schuylkill County Accounts for the year 1817, John Hammer Treasurer:"

Bounties, Etc.

Apr. 21, 1817
Bernard Eisenhuth for one wolf scalp and five puppies...$23.00
Bernard Eisenhuth, for one wolf scalp...$8.00

13. He appeared on the census in 1840 in Haines Township, Centre, Pennsylvania, United States. 19 The 1840 census recorded Barnard Eisenhood with this household:
ree White Persons - Males - Under 5: 2
Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 2
Free White Persons - Females - 20 thru 29: 1
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 1
Free White Persons - Under 20: 4
Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 6
Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 6

14. He appeared on the census in 1850 in Pottsville, Schuylkill, PA. 4 The 1850 census recorded in the Northwest Ward of Pottsville: George Eisenhuth, occupation "none, 43, living with Mary, 29 or 24 (handwriting unclear), Lydia, 15, George, 10, Sarah, 12, and Susan, 6.. Also in the household is George's father, Bernhard Eisenhuth, 84, and Henry Eisenhuth, 21, occupation clerk, and a Mary Logan, 17 Everyone was born in Pennsylvania, except for Logan in Ireland. George had no real estate value listed, suggesting he was renting.

Note that if Bernhard was 84 in 1850 then his birth year would be about 1766, not 1755 as reported in most sources.

15. He appeared on the census in 1850 in Rush Twp., Schuylkill, PA. 20 The 1850 census recorded Jacob Isenhuth, laborer, 58; Lydia, 56; Lydia, 20; Jacob, 18; Mary, 16; Benjamin 13; and Margaret, 10. Also in the home is Jacob's father Barnard Eisenhuth, 87; Thomas Heiser, teamster, 25; and Jacob's son, Barnard, laborer, 29; with his wife Catharine, 21; and their daughter Mary Alice, 2. Everyone was born in Pennsylvania.

16. Book: Bernarnd Eisenhuth was granted a lease to mine coal., Dec 1857. 21
Background: After the death of Stephen Girard (1750-1831), the lands he had purchased in Schuylkill county were supervised by a board of trustees for his estate, who determined they could raise capital by leasing them for coal mining, as explained as follows in the book, "Girard Estate Coal lands In Pennsylvania, 1801-1884."

"In December 1857, the committee instructed F. B. Kaercher, who had succeeded Poole as their agent in residence, to negotiate a coal lease. A lease was granted to Bernard Eisenhuth to mine coal on the Israel Cope tract with the coal to be sold to persons residing in Catawissa Valley. It appears that some mining was done with the coal being sold locally, but on such a small scale that it never resulted in a large prosperous operation."

Note: We can speculate that Eisenhuth was selected because he might have had a previous business relationship to timber the Girard properties, since that was Eisenhuth's profession in earlier years in Centre and Schuylkill counties.

17. His obituary was published in the Pottsville Standard on 30 Jun 1866 in Pottsville, Schuylkill, PA. 22
Bernard Eisenhuth
Aged 111 years, 3 months and 12 days.

Death of the "Oldest Inhabitant." - On Friday morning of last week, June 22, 1866, Mr. Bernard Eisenhuth died at New Castle in this county, aged over one hundred and eleven years. He was probably the oldest man in Pennsylvania.

He was born in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania and was Baptized on the 10th day of May, 1755, in the old Lutheran church at Lebanon. His age then was two months.

During the Revolutionary War he was left at home to take care of the family, while his father who Captain of Riflemen under General Anthony Wayne, was in the Army. It is supposed that Captain Eisenhuth was killed, as he never returned.

Mr. Eisenhuth afterwards removed to Berks county, where he married Catherine Saylor. She was born in Philadelphia. They had 10 children, 5 of whom are still living.

The early history of the family is not known correctly, as the house of Mr. Eisenhuth was destroyed by fire in 1806, and the family records etc. were consumed. His wife died in 1848, aged 95 years. Mr. Eisenhuth leaves 5 children, 41 grand children and 116 living descendants; probably as many more have died.

He was sick only five weeks, apparently suffering from nothing but weakness, and retained his consciousness to the last, dying as gently as though falling asleep.

In his younger days he was a powerful man. He was about 6 feet in height, raw boned and heavily built, with light brown hair, light complexion and blue eyes. He was a lumberman and trapper, and at the age of 105 years he worked in the harvest field with apparent ease.

He was always "early to bed and early to rise," being up at daylight every morning. He always ate plain food, and frequently lectured his descendants for using too much shortening, etc. in their food. He used liquor occasionally, but never to excess, and would taste only the best old-fashioned rye Whiskey.

At the age of 105 years, while at work clearing new land, he fell and severely injured his hips. He was by a physician fastened to a plank for nine weeks, and requested to remain nine days longer, but he refused to do so; and attempted to walk, when it was discovered that his hip was dislocated. The injury was properly attended to, and he was soon able to walk, but he was lame ever after from the effects of it.

He was attended during his last illness by Rev. U. Graves, of the English Ev. Lutheran Church of Pottsville, who at his request gave him the Communion; during the service the old man was melted to tears, and partook as intelligently as ever of the sacred elements. Nor did he forget this service while he continued to suffer out his days.

The last Sabbath of his life on earth he expressed a wish that he might be at church and hear Mr. Graves preach, but in a few days after that Sabbath he left these earthly scenes for the realities of another world.

The text from which Mr. Graves addresses the friends of the family at the funeral is found in Gen. xlvii, 9: "And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage are an hundred and thirty years; few and evil have the days of my life been and I have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their Pilgrimage."

Mr. Eisenhuth always voted the Democratic Ticket. He voted for Washington, and cast his vote at every presidential election in the United States. His last vote he cast for Abraham Lincoln, he (Mr. Lincoln) appearing to him like Washington.

Mr. Eisenhuth was one of a class that seem to be getting smaller yearly; to the class who do their duty to God and man, love their country for their country's sake, pay their debts and live honestly and frugally. He goes down to the grave respected and honored by all; and thus is broken one of the few living links between the by-gone past and present.

He was buried on Saturday last at the Old Lutheran Cemetery at Ringtown. His descendants are generally healthy and able-bodied, and carry their age remarkably well. Like himself, they are good, useful and law-abiding citizens. May our country be blessed with many more such men as the old patriarch who has been gathered to his fathers, Bernard Eisenhuth.

18. Newspaper: Harrisburg Telegraph: Death of the "Oldest Inhabitant.", 5 Jul 1866, Harrisburg, Dauphin, PA. 23 Death of the "Oldest Inhabitant."
One of our exchanges announces that on Friday of week before last, Mr. Barnard Eisenhuth died at New Castle, Schuylkill county, aged over one hundred and eleven years. He was probably the oldest man in Pennsylvania. He was born in Lebanon, Pa., and was baptized on the 10th of May, 1755, in the old Lutheran Church at Lebanon. His age at this time is not known, but he was probably an infant. During the Revolutionary war, he was left at home to care of the family, while his father, who was Captain of the reifleman under Anthony Wayne, was in the army. It is supposed that Captain Eisenhuth was killed, as he never returned. Mr. Eisenhuth afterwards removed to Berks county, where he married Catharine Saylor. She was born in Philadelphia. They had 10 children -- 5 of whom are still living. The early history of the family is not known, as the house of Mr. Eisenhuth was destroyed by fire in 1806, and the family records, etc., were consumed. His wife died in 1848, aged 95 years.
Mr. Eisenhuth leaves 5 children, 41 grandchildren, 63 great grand-children, and 7 great-great grand-children -- 116 living descendants, Probably as many more have died. He was sick only five weeks, apparently suffering from nothing but weakness, and retained his consciousness to the last, dying as gently as though falling to sleep. In his younger days he was a powerful man. He was about six feet in height, rawboned and heavily built, with light brown hair, light complexion and blue eyes. He was a farmer and lumberman, and at the age of 103 years worked in the harvest field with apparent ease. He was always "early to bed and early to rise," being up at daylight every morning.

19. Fact: A creek, Eisenhuth Run, Ryan Township, Schuylkill County, in1874 became Eisenhuth Reservoir, a principal water supply for the Pottsville Water Company. The creek is now named Mill Creek, but the earlier name confirms the Eisenhuth's lived here in 1800s.., 1874, Ryan Township, Schuylkill, PA.

20. Book: History of Schuylkill County, 1881. 9
Union Township Cemeteries. The earliest burying-ground was in connection with the Union church, and the first person interred in it was Jacob Eisenhauer, who died May 9th, 1815, aged two years, eleven months and twenty-six days. The first adult to whose memory a stone is erected was Daniel Kolb, who died January 5th, 1818. In this cemetery are stones erected to the memory of the following soldiers of 1812: Jacob Laudig, died July 17th, 1863, aged 77 years; Benjamin Sautzer, died November 29th, 1863, aged 71 years; William Dombuch, died October 5th, 1847, aged 69 years; Charles Bitting and Frederick Labenberg. The oldest person whose death is recorded on the burial tablets of this country church yard was Barnard Eisenhuth, aged one hundred and eleven years.

21. Book: Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Schuylkill County, 1893. 24
ANDREW C. EISENHUTH, an enterprising young shoe manufacturer of Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania, is a son of Henry and Catherine (Christ) Eisenhuth, and was born August 14, 1863, in Auburn, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania.

The great grandfather of our subject on the paternal side of the family, Bernard Eisenhuth, was almost a contemporary of George Washington himself, being born in March, 1755, in Lebanon county, Pennsylvania.

During the Revolutionary struggle, resulting in our National Independence, he was left at home to take care of the family, whilst his son, George Plisenhuth, the grandfather of our subject, was in the patriot army under General Anthony Wayne, with the rank of Captain. Conrad Eisenhuth removed to Berks county, where he married Catharine Saylor, a native of Philadelphia, and who died in 1848 at the advanced age of ninety-five years. He was among the pioneers of that county and became a lumberman, a trapper and a hunter, avocations indigenous to a pioneer life. He was a man of remarkable physical vigor, and at the age of one hundred and five years worked in the harvest field with apparent ease. His first vote was cast for George Washington, and he voted at every Presidential election down to Lincoln, dying in June, 1866, at the extreme age of one hundred and eleven years, three months'and twelve days.

Quite likely, George Eisenhuth, grandfather, was born in Auburn ; it is at least known that at an early day he went to Pottsville and became proprietor of a hotel on the present site of the Merchants' hotel. This hotel he operated a number of years, and accumulated considerable money, and invested extensively in the coal lands of the county. He removed to Shenandoah, this county, about the time that place was founded, and lived there until his death in 1884.

He was twice married ; first time to a Miss Saylor. Among the issue of this marriage was the father of subject His second marriage was with a Miss Mary Baer.

Henry Eisenhuth, father, was born in Millheim, Pa., in 1830, but has been a resident of Schuylkill county most of his life. He married Catharine Christ, who was born February 5, 1840, and died May 3, 1891. The fruit of this marriage was a family of seven children.: John, who is a station agent for the Lehigh Valley Railroad Company at Orwigsburg; Andrew C.; T. Harry, who is in the employ of his brother Andrew as bookkeeper and shipper; Kate, the wife of Howard Eisenburg, of Hazleton ; and Mamie, a milliner of Reading, Pa.; two died in infancy. In Mr. Eisenhuth's career we find an example of what a young man can accomplish even with a limited education, coupled with a strong will and indefatigable energy. After leaving the public schools of his township, he entered the Kutztown Normal school. He then taught school five terms, two of them in South Manheim township, two in Porter township, and one as principal of the Green Street building in the borough of Hazelton, Luzerne county. This position he resigned in 1884, to accept the position of bookkeeper in the office of A. E. Brown & Co., of Orwigsburg. He remained with that firm until January 1, 1892. During this time he made a study of the shoe business in all its details, and feeling that he was competent to pursue successfully the business on his own account, he formed an alliance with Alfred M. Miller, under the firm name Eisenhuth & Miller, and embarked in the manufacturing of shoes. The factory of this firm is located on the corner of Tannuary and Warren Streets, and is sixty feet long by forty wide, two stories high. It gives employment to forty hands, including six traveling salesmen. They manufacture children's and infants' turn shoes exclusively, and dispose of their product throughout the central and western States.

Mr. Eisenhuth is a republican, has served for eight years as town clerk, and is one of the school directors of his borough. He is a member of Schuylkill Lodge, No. 138, F. and A. M., of which lodge he is a Past Master; Mountain City Chapter, No. 196, R. A. M., at Pottsville ; Constantine Commandery, No. 41, Knights Templar, of same place; Grace Lodge, No. 157, I. O. O. F., of Orwigsburg, of which he is a past officer; and St Paul's Lutheran church, at Orwigsburg. His union with Anna R. Wernert, daughter of Victor Wernert, of Orwigsburg, on March 11, 1892, has been blessed with the following children: Harry, Lillian, Floyd and Marguerite.

22. Book: The Successful American, Volume 3, Part 1 - Volume 4, Part 1, 1900. 25
Within Biography of John Washington Eisenhuth (born 1860):

It is of interest to recall that his great grandfather, Bernard Eisenhuth, was one of the leading spirits of the Revolution and voted to elect George Washington President and lived to cast his vote for Abraham Lincoln, living until the age of one hundred and eleven years and six months, enjoying every faculty and never using a cane nor glasses and when asked why he changed his politics in voting for Lincoln, replied that Lincoln's principles and the platform which he represented were identical with those of Washington.

23. Book: Beecher Family History: Bernard Eisenhuth, 1972. 26
Written in 1978 by our family genealogist, Bruce Franklin Beacher Ph.d (1919-2004)

BERNARD "BARNEY" EISENHUTH was well-known among Pennsylvania's backwoodsmen. Fair-haired and blue-eyed, he stood a full head above most of his short-statured contemporaries. His youthfulness was astonishing; he was destined to live longer than any other man in Pennsylvania--over ill years! Born in the Lebanon Valley and baptized a Lutheran on May 10, 1755 (probably by John Casper Stoever, the younger), he grew to six feet and assumed charge of the family when his father left to serve as Captain of Riflemen under General Anthony Wayne. Capt. EISENHUTH never returned, presumably killed in action.

In their youth, BARNEY EISENHUTH and JACOB BICHER were friends in the Lebanon community. But the EISENHUTHs left Lebanon for new lands opening in the mountain valleys after the war. BARNEY met and married a Philadelphia girl, CATHERINE SAYLOR, and tried farming in Pine Grove Township (then Berks County.) They had ten children before fire destroyed their home in 1806 and, with it, most of the family's keepsakes. Relatives and the demand for lumbermen to serve the rapidly growing iron industry of Centre County drew Barney and his family to that area where the EISENHUTH name became established in Penn Township.

When young JOHN JACOB BICHER reached manhood he left the Lebanon Valley seeking his independence and livelihood, as well as his heart's desire--ANGELINE EISENHUTH. Nothing could have pleased his grandfather and BARNEY EISENHUTH more when the young couple married in 1837 and proceeded to bring a succession of sons into the world that welded the bond between the old friends for life.

The firstborn of JACOB and ANGELINE was named WILLIAM, honoring JACOB BICHER's brother and other family ancestors. His brothers arrived with regularity--JOHN JACOB (1840), HIRAM (1842), BENJAMIN (1845), GEORGE (1849) and NATHAN (1851.) Meanwhile opportunity for lumbermen shifted eastward to Schuylkill County, the focus of the evolving hard coal mining industry. It was there where the first and only daughter, MARY, broke the male dynasty in 1853. The family moved to Pottsville before 1850 when the flurry of inventions for coal stoves, ovens and furnaces, the development of railroads, and the application of machinery to mining multiplied coal production 40 to 50 fold.

Lumbermen, miners, masons and other tradesmen were drawn as by a magnet to the center of action in Schuylkill County. The word "schuylkill" is Swedish, meaning "to hide." The county is named after the river. Picturesque mountains and valleys hid the great deposits of coal until anthracite became a prime fuel. Now the torn hillsides and great rounds of mine tailings are mute reminders of the historic, albeit frantic, mining period.

Sadly, BARNEY EISENHUTH lost his wife in 1848 when she was 95. He was still capable of a day's work, and already a legend in the State. He moved his home to Pottsville with son GEORGE EISENHUTH and nearby ANGELINE and her sons.

The 1850 United States Census records JACOB BIEGER, tailor, living in the South Ward, Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with his wife, ANGELINE, and six sons. The earliest settlers of the community were from Alsace-Lorraine and Switzerland, via the Schoharie Valley (New York) settlement and the Pennsylvania-German speaking JACOB and his family were at home among fellow "Germans." But Pottsville literally exploded with growth as mining developed and the railroad came to town. It became the seat of Schuylkill County in 1851 as well as the center of communications for rail and stagecoach travel and the news.

Life was rough by today's standards--mining, drinking and fighting became commonplace together and churches were few and sparsely attended. But the people were courageous and patriotic. Volunteers joined the campaign against Mexico under the leadership of Captain James Nagle and the young BIEGER boys followed the news with keen interest in the Freiheits Press and the Miners Journal. Emotions ran high with the outbreak of the War Between the States and when Lee threatened Pennsylvania at Gettysburg WILLIAM and JOHN enlisted.

Many families coming to America have experienced name changes. The BEACHERS are no exception and the enlistment of the Sons of JACOB and ANGELINE in the Union Army marked the introduction and permanent attachment of BEACHER to this branch of the original BUCHER line. Coincidentally in Lebanon, Pennsylvania at about the same time, the enlistment of WILLIAM BICHER, blood-relative of WILLIAM of Pottsville, introduced the name of BEICHER to that line of the family.

JOHN and BENJAMIN BEACHER survived the campaign without injury and returned home to be mustered out of service on August 23, 1865. Brother WILLIAM also had re-enlisted as a private, this time in Company C, 194th Regiment Infantry, at Pottsville, on July 13, 1864. The regiment was sent to Baltimore for provost duty before returning to Harrisburg, where WILLIAM was mustered out of the service on November 6, 1864.

While the War was in progress, other events were shaping a future home for the BEACHERS in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania. For a long time the site had been occupied only by an old tavern, the Kaley House. PETER KALEY (or KEHLEY) settled there to farm sometime after 1820. He found some coal which he carried to the blacksmith in Ringtown over the mountain. But the great seam of coal beneath him attracted the Philadelphia Land Company to purchase his right, allowing him to remain there until his death in 1860. Mining began in earnest in 1862. P. W. SFIAEFER of Pottsville laid out "Shenandoah City," choosing an Indian name meaning "sprucy stream" (Or perhaps, "daughter of the stars.") The first building was a frame hotel, followed by houses on Cherry street, where JACOB and ANGELINE BEACHER and their family would settle.

When the War ended, marriages quickly followed. BENJAMIN married SARAH JANE JACOBS while his brother, JOHN, stood as a witness with his girl-friend, ANGELINE OCOM (or OKUM), whom he soon married. HIRAM BEACHER married HENRIETTA JACOBS and established his home in Mt. Carmel.

The Nation would never be the same after the War Between the States, nor would the BEACHER families ever again enjoy a role model like BARNEY EISENHUTH. At the age of 105 while clearing land, he fell and severely injured his hips. He was fastened to a plank by a physician for nine weeks and finally could remain no longer, although requested to do so. He was soon able to walk painfully, suffering from the effects thereafter. On June 22, 1866 at the age of 111 years, 3 months and 12 days, he departed this life. He was attended during his last illness by the Reverend U. Graves of the English Evangelical Lutheran Church in Pottsville, who at his request gave him the Communion. During the service the patriarch was melted to tears, and partook as intelligently as ever of the sacred elements. He was laid to rest with other Eisenhuths and Eisenhowers in the beautiful setting. of the Old White Church cemetery near Ringtown, the oldest church in Schuylkill county.

BARNEY EISENHUTH left five children, forty-one grandchildren and one hundred and sixteen living descendants. Probably as many more predeceased him. His impact on the BEACHERS was far more than genetic. He was always "early to bed and early to rise," being up at daylight every morning. He always ate plain food, and frequently lectured his descendants for using too much shortening, etc. in their food. He used liquor occasionally, but never to excess, and would taste only the best old-fashioned rye whiskey. Arriving in the world at the outset of the French and Indian War he had experienced the yoke of colonialism, watched his father go off in the struggle for independence without return, followed the Contention among the new States and finally the supreme struggle to maintain the Union. He voted for every President from George. Washington to Abraham Lincoln. He was eulogized in the Pottsville Standard as "one of a class that seem to be getting smaller yearly; to the class who do their duty to God and man, love their country for their country's sake, pay their debts and live honestly and frugally. He goes down to the grave respected and honored by all.. .one of the few living links between the by-gone past and present."

JACOB and ANGELINE BEACHER lived out the rest of their lives through the 1880's in Shenandoah, never forgetting the grand old man or failing to recount his life and character to their children and grandchildren. JACOB's own grandfather, the Elder of Lebanon, preceded BARNEY EISENHUTH in death by nearly a quarter of a century, and the families gradually lost contact.

JACOB's brother, WILLIAM BICHER (BEICHER) died in 1880 and was interred in Mount Lebanon Cemetery by his son, WILLIAM, a veteran of Company K, 127th Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, along with their mother MARY MICHAL BICHER and other relatives. The BIECHER name was carried into the 20th century in Lebanon by 'four sons and four daughters of the marriage of the veteran WILLIAM to LOUISA HARTMAN EMBICH.

It is one of life's fateful facts that bloodlines diverge and lose contact. What an event it would be if all were to be reunited at the feet of the patriarchs and grand dames to renew associations and exchange experiences! But especially to look for the familiar twinkle of an eye, dimpled smile, or gesture that one could identify at once with an ancestor and relative. There is no doubt that some might be called "Little Barney" or "Little Jacob" or "Little Angeline" if this were to happen. And the honored elders would, no doubt, beam their approval.


Bernard married Anna Maria Orwig, daughter of Johann Gottfried Orwig and Ann Clara Lampert. (Anna Maria Orwig was born on 19 Dec 1751 in Maiden Creek, Berks, PA 27 and died in 1778 in West Brunswick Twp., Schuylkill, PA.)


Bernard next married Catherine Saylor in 1780 in , Berks, PA.1 (Catherine Saylor was born on 9 May 1767 in Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA,5 12 28 died on 20 Jan 1849 in Mahanoy City, Schuylkill, PA 5 12 28 and was buried in Ringtown: St. Paul's Old White Church Cemetery, Schuylkill, PA 28.)

  Noted events in their marriage were:

1. They have conflicting marriage information of 1780 and Lebanon, Lebanon, PA. 29


  Marriage Notes:

Bernard Eisenhuth's obituary published in the newspaper said he was married to Catherine Saylor in Berks County, not Lebanon County as other sources report.

Sources


1 Pottsville Standard, 6/30/1866 Obituary.

2 http://www.familysearch.org, Source Information: Batch Number: 8511403 <search_igi.asp?batch_number=8511403®ion=11&juris1=&juris2=&juris3=&juris4=&juris1friendly=&juris2friendly=&juris3friendly=&juris4friendly=®ionfriendly=North+America> Sheet: 86 Source Call No.: 1395996 <../../library/fhlcatalog/supermainframeset.asp?display=filmhitlist&columns=*%2C180%2C0&filmno=1395996>
.

3 Publications of the Historical Society of Schuylkill County (The HIstorical Society of Schuylkill County, Pottsville, Pennsylvania. Multiple volumes, some online in Google Books search or Archive.org.), Vol. 4. "Extracts From An Early Schuylkill County Account Book", Prepared by CW Unge. Read Before the Society March 3 1911. Page 57.

4 1850 United States Census, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4CB-62S George Eisenhuth, Pottsville, northwest ward, Schuylkill, Pennsylvania, United States; citing family 630.

5 Family Records of Phyllis Osborne, great granddaughter of Margaret Anna Eisenhuth, who passed family records to her. (Email from phyllisjosborne@yahoo.com), Email dated 28 Jul 2003.

6 Find A Grave, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=117369022.

7 Ancestry.com, Pennsylvania and New Jersey, Church and Town Records, 1708-1985, PA > Schuylkill > Ringtown > St. Paul's Lutheran and Reformed Union. Barnet Eisenhuth b. 16 May 1754 d. 22 Jun 1866 112 years 1 monoth 6 days.

8 Pottsville Standard.

9 W. W. Munsell, History of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania (New York: W. W. Munsell & Co., 36 Vesey Street, 1881), Page 355.

10 Genealogy Research conducted by Bruce Franklin Beacher Ph.D. (1919-2004).

11 (Posting on www.ancestry.com).

12 Daughters of the American Revolution Lineage Books (Online register at www.dar.org), Lineage Book : NSDAR : Volume 137 : 1917-1918, Page 309, Mrs. Sara Miller Ruth #136982.

13 Egle, William Henry, editor, Pennsylvania Archives: Third Series (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania State printer, 1894-99. Description v. pl., maps. 22 cm.), Vol. XVIII, page 216. Barnet Eisenhude.

14 Egle, William Henry, editor, Pennsylvania Archives: Third Series (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania State printer, 1894-99. Description v. pl., maps. 22 cm.), Vol. XVIII, page 458. Bernard Eisenhood.

15 Pennsylvania, Revolutionary War Military Abstract Card File Indexes (Pennsylvania State Archives, Archives Records Information Access System (ARIAS). Online at http://www.digitalarchives.state.pa.us/), Eisenhuth, Bernet. http://www.digitalarchives.state.pa.us/archive.asp?view=ArchiveItems&ArchiveID=13&FID=463275&LID=463374&FL=E&Page=3.

16 1800 United States Census.

17 1810 United States Census, Pennsylvania, Berks County, Brunswick Township, Roll M252_45, Page 137.

18 Journal of the Senate of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), Volume 26. Pages 246, 268, 270, 277, 282, 300, 309, 330, 409. Online https://books.google.com/books?id=-PJBAQAAMAAJ in Google Books.

19 1840 United States Census, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHTC-WKK Barnard Eisenhood, Haines Township, Centre, Pennsylvania, United States; citing p. 78.

20 1850 United States Census, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M4CY-JJJ Jacob Isenhuth, Rush, Schuylkill, Pennsylvania, United States; citing family 207.

21 Hoffman, John Nathan, Girard estate coal lands in Pennsylvania, 1801-1884 (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1972. 86 pages.), Page 17.

22 Pottsville Standard, 30 Jun 1866, obituary of Bernard Eisenhuth, Pennsylvania's Oldest Man.

23 (Harrisburg Telegraph, Harrisburg, Dauphin, Pennsylvania.), 5 Jul 1866, page 3. Death of the "Oldest Inhabitant" Barnard Eisenhuth.

24 Wiley & Ruoff, Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, 1893 (1893), Page 307.

25 The Successful American, Volume 3, Part 1 - Volume 4, Part 1 (Press Biographical Company, 1900. Online at http://books.google.com/books?id=cGpMAAAAYAAJ .), Page 504.

26 Genealogy Research conducted by Bruce Franklin Beacher Ph.D. (1919-2004), 1972 Article from Beacher Family History: Jacob and Angeline.

27 Family Records of Phyllis Osborne, great granddaughter of Margaret Anna Eisenhuth, who passed family records to her. (Email from phyllisjosborne@yahoo.com).

28 Find A Grave, http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=9053675.

29 http://www.familysearch.org.



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